Talk: Guide Your Team with an Email Playbook

#LitmusLive

Thanks for attending my talk, Guide Your Team with an Email Playbook, at Litmus Live! Links to related resources can be found below.

Let’s stay connected and keep the #emailgeek and #litmuslive conversations going!

Guide Your Team with an Email Playbook – San Francisco (General Track)

Resources

User Story – What is a user story?
Validate or Die: Using Validation to Build the Right Product – Why and how you should validate your product
The Practical Guide to Creating Empathy Maps – Detailed article from UXPin about empathy maps in the user persona process
What is an Empathy Map? – Agile guide from Solutions IQ outlining how to create an empathy map

Other Resources

The Lean Startup Methodology
Manifesto for Agile Software Development
Riker Ipsum

Takeaways

Guide Your Team with an Email Playbook (Takeaways) [29KB] – A shorten slide deck, featuring just fun stuff—I mean—key takeaways seen below

  • An email style guide is useful for developers, but may not be as relevant for marketers
  • An email playbook has the potential to add value for development and marketing
  • Getting buy in from development, marketing, leadership, etc will set you up for success
  • A user story framework can help articulate business value
  • Audit your emails and existing content to see trends, gaps and education opportunities
  • Validate your concept and iterate as you go
  • Socialize your playbook with your department, company or team
  • Have a plan for keeping your email playbook up-to-date

Guide Your Team with an Email Playbook – Boston (Developer Track)

Presentation Slides [5 MB] – Presentation slides from Litmus Live talk in Boston

If you have questions about this process or would like to know more, see me at table #10 during the Ask an Expert session on Tuesday and Wednesday. Or, shoot me an email.

Resources

The Practical Guide to Creating Empathy Maps – Detailed article from UXPin about empathy maps in the user persona process
What is an Empathy Map? – An agile guide from Solutions IQ outlining how to create an empathy map

Email Playbook & Workflow

Presentation Slides [2.6 MB] – Slides from my mini-talk during the Reinvent Your Email Workflow workshop

Resources

Mint Email ExamplesOne, two and three product promotion examples from Mint
Remember Santeria by Sublime – Spiffy use of an animated gif from Spotify
18 Email Stats to Quote at Parties – I’m 100% quoting these stats from Emma at parties
Bad Behavior – Another fly newsletter example from The Outline
Value Stream Mapping – Helpful exercise in identifying wait times and pain points in your workflow
The Practical Guide to Creating Empathy Maps – Detailed article from UXPin about empathy maps in the user persona process
What is an Empathy Map? – Agile guide from Solutions IQ outlining how to create an empathy map

All images, unless otherwise noted, are from Unsplash

Talk: What I Learned From Managing My First Open Source Project on Github

Update: Links to my presentation slides are now available for download


It’s hard to believe that Codeland is only a few days away!

via GIPHY

Here, you’ll find some resources and links related to my talk, What I Learned From Managing My First Open Source Project on Github. The conference will be recorded so check back later for slides and video links.

Project Files

How Many Days Until Halloween? – The project that started it all! Not sure how many days until the spookiest day of the year? No worries, this webpage will do the counting for you.

Fork the project files on Github – Peak behind the code and see firsthand how this project evolved over time. Contributions are always welcome!

Presentation Slides [6.5 MB] – A PDF of my presentation slides can be downloaded here.

If you are attending Codeland, these links can also be found in the conference booklet

What I Learned From Managing My First Open Source Project on Github
What I Learned From Managing My First Open Source Project on Github, Codeland 2018

Resources

  • Bootstrap – Bootstrap is an open source toolkit for developing with HTML, CSS, and JavaScript
  • GitHub Glossary – A list of common Git and GitHub specific terms
  • GitHub Guides – Short guides or tutorials covering various GitHub topics and features
  • Hacktoberfest – Hacktoberfest is a month-long celebration of open source software
  • Open Source Guides – An extensive collection of resources for individuals, communities, and companies who want to learn how to run and contribute to an open source project
  • Open Source Survey – The Open Source Survey is an open data project by GitHub and collaborators from academia, industry, and the broader open source community

Terms

  • Conflict – Competing differences between code files
  • Git – A free and open source distributed version control system
  • GitHub – Git repository hosting service and community
  • Markdown – Markdown is a plain text markup language
  • Open Source – Open source software is software that can be freely used, modified, and shared by anyone.
  • Squash – Combining several commits into one

See you at the Conference!


Photo by Shannon Crabill is licensed under CC BY 2.0

It’s Official! I’ll be Speaking at Codeland!

Photo by Matteo Catanese on Unsplash

It’s official! I will be speaking at Codeland in 2018! I’ll be speaking about my experiences in open source and I couldn’t be more excited!

For those who do not know, Codeland is an “interactive, two-day conference filled with talks, panels, and workshops with the most supportive community of programmers and people learning to code.” It is produced by CodeNewbie which is “the most supportive community of programmers
and people learning to code.” CodeNewbie also hosts a popular podcast and weekly Twitter chat.

Codeland is May 4 & 5, 2018 in New York City. Tickets can be purchased here while supplies last!

The One Where I Attended WordCamp Baltimore

Lanyard from the 2017 Baltimore Wordcamp

Last weekend, I attended Baltimore WordCamp.

While the weekend was filled with several great talks, I wanted to share some of my favorite takeaways.

Launching Your Freelance Career the Right Way by Erica Mays
In working as a freelancer for several years, speaker Erica Mays learned a lot. In her talk, a simple and worth repeating advice is to always have a portfolio website. Get a domain name (yourname.com is always a safe bet) and update it at least once every three months. It doesn’t matter if you use a theme or build your site from scratch. Have a portfolio site, keep it clean, responsive and highlight the quality work that you can do.

SASS Isn’t Scary by Beth Soderberg
I’ll be the first to admit, I almost didn’t attend this session because I was spooked by the idea of SASS. Luckily, Beth Soderberg did an amazing job of highlighting what SASS can do and how to get started.

For those who do not know, SASS (Syntactically awesome stylesheet) is a CSS preprocessor that makes managing code easier to maintain by doing some of the work for you. To start with using SASS, you can take an incremental approach. Vanilla CSS can fit right into a .scss file and, technically, that is all you need to start. You can update your SASS file as you learn to nest styles and create mixins. 

It’s Never Just a Website by Jessica Watson
Being a web developer isn’t what defines you. In her talk about websites and working with clients Jessica elaborates that every client has a story. A client has a story and you, the web designer/web developer are only a chapter within that story.

On the subject of working with clients, it may not be a surprised by those website proposals that we spend so much time one, are rarely read. Knowing that, how do you get the information you need and make sure the client is aware of expectations? Start by skipping the cookie-cutter questions. You need to dig deeper. Ask why does their work matter? Who cares about what they do and why?

 

Sessions from the weekend can be viewed on wordpress.tv.

Visit baltimore.wordcamp.org or follow @wordcampbalt and to stay in the loop for next year’s WordCamp!

Top Tech Conferences I’m Watching Right Now

Empty Conference Chairs | Photo by ål nik on Unsplash

I don’t think of myself as an extroverted person, but I enjoy attending tech conferences. The buzz of being in a room of other like-minded people when there is so much to learn is difficult to replicate elsewhere.

That said, I try to stalk the internet regularly for relevant conferences.

I do email development by day but have interests that span to other parts of tech, design and web development.  I certainly don’t have an endless amount of cash to attend some or all of these conferences, but I certainly can dream.

Here are the top conferences I’m looking forward to for 2017 (and 2018)!

Adobe Max / Adobe Summit
Las Vegas, NV
I’m including these two together because the content has some overlap. Adobe Summit is advertised as a conference for Digital Marketers while Adobe Max is for creatives. I was lucky enough to attend Adobe Summit and even with not being a marketer, got a lot out of it. There was a lot of content (multiple tracks running at once) and I got to see demos and sneak peaks of upcoming Adobe Products.

Codeland
New York City, NY
Codeland is a conference by CodeNewbie, the popular Podcast for beginners to tech and coding. Codeland was held for the first time in 2017. Although I was not able to attend, I heard great things about it and I’m looking forward to attending in 2018! If you are a fan of the CodeNewbie community (I love their weekly Twitter Chats) this may be worth checking out.

Ela Conf
Philadelphia, PA
I heard about Ela Conf by chance via Twitter. I hadn’t seen many conferences focus on the leadership aspect of tech so I bought my ticket as soon as possible. Ela Conf prides its self on being “a safe, inclusive tech leadership conference” and I couldn’t be more excited to attend later this month!

Lanyards by Simon Collison on Flickr
Lanyards by Simon Collison on Flickr

Front End Design Conference
St.Petersburg, FL
Similar to Ela Conf, I was excited to hear about a conference that caters to a specific group within web development. I consider myself a Front-End Developer so some web development conference seems intimidating from the outside. Coming into its 10th year I’d consider attending the Front End Design Conference in 2018.

GitHub Universe
San Francisco, CA
Git and Github are necessary tools to know if contribute or write code in any way. I consider myself a beginner in Git / Github with a desire to learn more. The line up of speakers for 2017 has folks from different roles, companies, and aspects of tech. Bonus! Github Universe is being streamed live for those of us at home!

Litmus Live
Boston, MA
If you work in email design, development and/or marketing, this conference is one you have to try and attend. With development and marketing tracks, and optional workshops, there is something for everyone else. I attended (and spoke!) in 2016 and had a blast hanging with my #emailgeeks. Bonus, the conference also travels to London and San Francisco and attending one will give you access to videos of all three locations afterward.

A post shared by kate (@katemharmon) on

Word Camp Baltimore
Baltimore, MD
Who can pass up a tech conference in their home state? WordPress is a popular, open source CMS and Word Camps are conferences put on by local chapters. I attended Word Camp Baltimore in 2016 for the first time and had a blast (the night ended in Karaoke) and did not hesitate when ticket went on sale earlier this year. Multiple tracks are running at once where everyone is encouraged to switch rooms/sessions to find which works best for you.

Write / Speak / Code
Portland, OR
Another conference that focuses on the non-code related aspects of working in tech. I’m interested in technical writing and contributing, so I’ve been watching Write / Speak / Code for a while. Their conference is four days with a different track/theme each day. Write / Speak / Code also has local chapters / meet up groups with other events throughout the year.

More conference chatter to come!


Photo by ål nik on Unsplash